Art Deco House in Sidi Ifni
©AnnieWrightPhotography

Art Deco House in Sidi Ifni

This Art Deco bungalow in Sidi Ifni (Morocco) dates from the time when this seaside town was colonised by the Spanish, who left as recently as 1969. Sadly, the house…

Read More
Artic Willow the Goatling; Update
© www.anniewrightphotography.com

Artic Willow the Goatling; Update

Goats, Arctic Willow, Orkney
© www.anniewrightphotography.com

Since this photo of a year ago, Artic Willow has become a mum to daughter Aspen, who’s already won the best kid class at an agricultural show on Orkney where they both live. In a couple of weeks time I’ll back on the Northern Isles and hoping to photograph both of them. Goats are extraordinary animals but tough to work with because they’re in a  state of constant motion. So making a portrait like the one above involves at least as much luck as skill… In short, I’m crossing my fingers and hoping to get lucky again!

(more…)

Read More

The Blue World of Chefchaouen

Blue World, Chefchaouen, Morocco

© www.anniewrightphotography.com 

When I first heard of the blue world of Chefchaouen in Northern Morocco, I wondered whether the buildings had been painted that colour as a gimmick to attract tourists. But the truth is far more interesting. After the Jews were expelled from Spain in 1492, some of them settled in Chefchaouen. They brought the colour with them because, in Judaism, it represents the colour of the divine and the sky: the celestial. And although most of the Jewish community in Morocco left for Israel in the late 1950s and ’60s, Chefchaouen remains true blue to this very day. 

Photographing this environment was an intensely spiritual experience and I felt like I was floating in an infinite blueness, a world without end. I also found myself thinking about the two artists who shared this azure obsession. The first is Yves Klein (1928-1962) who developed and patented International Klein Blue: a dark and saturated shade found throughout Chefchaouen although I suspect this has nothing to do with Klein’s influence.

The second artist is Derek Jarman (1942-1994) who, along with me, was one of the participants in “Coming Out, Sexuality, Gender & Identity”, a recent exhibition at the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool and Birmingham Museums & Art Gallery. He first wanted to make a blue film in 1974 because he was inspired by both International Klein Blue and Yves Klein’s desire to transcend reality so as to reach an immaterial, mystical beyond. Jarman was also a mystical artist and often used religious imagery of tormented beauty and heroic suffering to represent aspects of homosexual identity. Diagnosed with HIV in 1986, he returned to his idea of a blue film idea once he started losing his eyesight and medication caused him to see the world through a dense blue filter. “Blue” was completed in 1993 and Derek Jarman died the following year of AIDS-related complications.

(more…)

Read More

Talk About My Work at Birmingham Museums

Coming Out, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, Birmingham Museums & Art Gallery, LGBTI

A talk about my work “Hiding the Wound: Homage to Mr. Freud” was held recently as part of the Coming Out exhibition at Birmingham Museums & Art Gallery. It was given by the very eloquent Andrea Bonnell and attended by a lively audience of staff members and general public. 

I made this piece back in 1979 in response to Freud’s implication that women are “imperfect” and therefore inferior to men. Here, the act of sewing was not only a light-hearted reaction to the female experience of male supremacy but also, and more seriously, a symbolic surgical suture representing the desire for sexual autonomy. But that was then and, I wondered, how would people react nowadays to “Hiding the Wound”?

Andrea’s talk was deservedly a huge success and was followed by some very thought provoking discussions. Some people even took the trouble to leave written comments to be passed on to me. Here’s a selection: “Thank you for being bold and expressive. And for challenging constructs which pass others by. Your works seems even more relevant today and it feels like something which is essential to revisit periodically to redefine its meaning and relevance in the movement.”and “Simplicity and ‘non-drama’ make the piece resonate because female sexuality should not be an issue, nor a trophy for men.”

(more…)

Read More