Coming Out Goes to Birmingham

Originally shown at the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool, the landmark exhibition Coming Out, Sexuality, Gender & Identity has now travelled on to the Birmingham Museum & Gallery. It features over 80…

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Cloud Appreciation Society

AnnieWrightPhotography-Cloud-Appreciation-Society-Mainland Orkney_0124-72
© www.anniewrightphotography.com

Last summer, the Cloud Appreciation Society jointly launched a competition with Stromness Museum for the best cloud photos taken on any of the 72 islands of Orkney. The deadline is May 2018 and you can enter eight shots, which gives plenty of scope for clouds of all kinds and seasons. With its vast skyscapes, Orkney is the perfect location for appreciating clouds. So I too pointed my camera upwards and began to snap away.

It was an astonishing experience. Sometimes involving delicate sky calligraphy and sometimes suggesting Armageddon and impending doom.

After a few days, it became quite normal for me to wander through fields with my head almost literally in the clouds. And it’s a wonder that I didn’t fall over, especially as I felt distinctly light headed!

It’s October now and I will be returning to Orkney for an exhibition at the Northlight Gallery in Stromness. That’s an adventure in itself and will involve lots of hard work. But I’ll also be taking plenty of cloud breaks, which – without doubt – will give me a completely  different perspective on the world. (more…)

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Family Resemblance?

Is there a family resemblance between these two cats? Both were photographed in Fez Medina in Morocco. The top photo of the elderly gentleman was taken by me in 2013…

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Lost In Time at the Northlight Gallery
© www.anniewrightphotography.com

Lost In Time at the Northlight Gallery

Northlight Gallery, Stromness, Orkney
© www.anniewrightphotography.com

This is where I will be in three weeks and three days time: back in Orkney where I’m having an exhibition at the excellent Northlight Gallery in Stromness. It’s called “Lost In Time”, a title which describes how I experience photography where losing myself, all sense of time and my bearings are essential elements in the intuitive process of finding the unexpected. This show juxtaposes journeys in the Middle East and North Africa with those made in Ireland and Orkney. In other words: places that either very, very dry or extremely wet: the Sahara meets bog. 
(more…)

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The Amazing Arctic Tern
© www.anniewrightphotography.com

The Amazing Arctic Tern

Arctic tern
© www.anniewrightphotography.com

When this bird sqauwked loudly above my head, I had no idea that it was an arctic tern and one of the most extraordinary creatures in the world. I did realise it was trying to warn me it had a nest and was imploring to stay away from the chicks. Although I didn’t know where the nest could be, I soon learned that no squawking meant I was moving in the right direction and that frantic squawking indicated that I was risking a re-run of Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Birds”.  (more…)

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Tempus Fugit Memento Mori

Tempus Fugit Memento Mori, St Magnus Cathedral
© www.anniewrightphotography.com

Tempus fugit memento mori – time flies, remember death – is a sentiment found in every historic, Scottish graveyard through graphic renditions of skulls and crossbones. In fact, you could be forgiven for thinking that here lies the remains of pirates. This photo shows an example of this, a 17th century gravestone located at St Magnus Cathedral in Kirkwall, Orkney. (more…)

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Étude Gothique

Marinus, Étude Gothique, cathedral

Yesterday I visited Marinus Boezem’s Étude Gothique at the Kunstlinie Almere, where Rheims Cathedral’s ground plan has been delineated in birdseed. It was also a happy reunion that started last March at Amsterdam’s Oudekerk. Here, I filmed and photographed The Weather, a performance involving his weather map projections and cello music by Frances-Marie Uitti.

In the 1980s, Marinus worked on several major projects where landscape plays an important role. His greatest and most important work from this period is The Green Cathedral (1978–1987), which Étude Gothique is based on. For The Green Cathedral,  174 Italian poplars were planted in a polder landscape in Flevoland. The trees reproduce the ground plan of Rheims Cathedral. Much of Boezem’s spatial work can be located in the tradition of Land Art, and motifs such as landscape, space, climate, light, air and cartography play a central role in this work. 

(more…)

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Be A Photographic Beachcomber
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Be A Photographic Beachcomber

Beachcomber, photography, Mulranny, Ireland
© www.anniewrightphotography.com

Every photographer should also be a beachcomber. Or a regular visitor to flea markets. Or a connoisseur of auction houses. Because everywhere, chance finds and hidden treasures are literally waiting to be discovered. My favourite example is this prehistoric implement, which I found washed up on an Irish beach.

And all you need to do is train your eye.

This approach can equally be applied to photography, where you recognise the exceptional rather than attempt to create it from scratch or through applying pre-existing expectations.  

It’s simply a case of you will know it when you find it… (more…)

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The Kingdom of Heaven at St Magnus Cathedral
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The Kingdom of Heaven at St Magnus Cathedral

Kingdom of Heaven, St Magnus Cathedral, Orkney
© www.anniewrightphotography.com

A crown, the enticing offer of the Kingdom of Heaven adorning a 17th century tomb at St Magnus Cathedral on Orkney. What I particularly like about this is the tomb’s three dimensional realism where the extended arm neatly balances the crown on its dainty finger tips. Naturally there is a Christian message here, which aims to cajole the viewer into sticking to the straight and narrow rather than succumbing to devilish delights. 

St. Magnus Cathedral – the red cathedral – dominates the skyline of Kirkwall, the largest town of Orkney, a group of islands off the north coast of mainland Scotland. It is also the most northerly cathedral in Britain, a fine example of Romanesque architecture built for bishops when the islands were ruled by the Norse Earls of Orkney. It is owned not by the church, but by the burgh of Kirkwall as a result of an act of King James III of Scotland following Orkney’s annexation by the Scottish Crown in 1468. It has also its own dungeon, presumably for those indulging in sinful practices. (more…)

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